AQA English Literature

On AQA Lit Subject Knowledge Gems

 

gems

This is a post co-written with Sarah Barker (@MsSFax) and Amy Forrester (@amymayforrester) with a view to collating in one place all the fab posts written to enhance teachers’ subject knowledge of the AQA Lit texts.

You will see that there are a fair few gaps. The other aim of writing this post is to highlight where there opportunities for posts to be written about set texts. If you spot a gap and know of a great post already out there that we’ve missed, please let us know. If you spot a gap and fancy writing a post on it, write it and please let us know.

Do your thing Team English!

PAPER ONE: SHAKESPEARE AND THE 19TH-CENTURY NOVEL

Section A: Shakespeare

Macbeth

‘Something wicked this way comes’ – Macbeth and the Gothic Tradition by Lance Hanson

Masculinity by Lance Hanson

Macbeth – some thoughts on a few deeper issues by Lance Hanson

Hear the one about the dead Queen? by Matt Pinkett

 

Romeo and Juliet

Blokes and birds – look at them, phwoar, I mean, soar by Chris Curtis

The Tempest

The Merchant of Venice

Much Ado About Nothing

Julius Caesar 

 

Section B: The 19th-Century Novel

The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

Etiquette, sexual repression and body snatching – A Guide to the context of Jekyll & Hyde by Mark Roberts

The Flaneur in Jekyll and Hyde by Lance Hanson

Post script to ‘The Flaneur in Jekyll and Hyde’: uncanny homes by Lance Hanson

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – still thinking about AO3 and extract to whole by Lance Hanson

Jekyll and Hyde – social context by Lance Hanson

Jekyll and Hyde and the Gothic Novel by Lance Hanson

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – reading the last chapter by Lance Hanson

A Christmas Carol

Teaching A Christmas Carol by Alex Quigley

Let the context do the talking… A Christmas Carol by Lance Hanson

Jacob Marley’s Bowel Movements by Chris Curtis

Great Expectations

Jane Eyre

Frankenstein

Pride and Prejudice

The Sign of Four

 

PAPER TWO: MODERN TEXTS AND POETRY

Section A: Modern Prose or Drama

An Inspector Calls

What happens when we teach interpretations of literature as facts? by Andy Tharby

The importance of Eva Smith by Lance Hanson

Blood Brothers

The History Boys

DNA

DNA – A Study Guide by Lance Hanson

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

A Taste of Honey

Lord of the Flies

Telling Tales

Animal Farm

Never Let Me Go

Anita and Me

Pigeon English

 

Section B: Poetry

Love and Relationships

When We Two Parted 

Love’s Philosophy

Porphyria’s Lover

Sonnet 29 – ‘I think of thee!’

Neutral Tones

The Farmer’s Bride

Walking Away

Letters From Yorkshire

Eden Rock

Follower

Mother, any distance

Before You Were Mine

Winter Swans

Singh Song! 

Climbing My Grandfather

 

Power and Conflict

Ozymandias

London

Marks of weakness, marks of woe by Sarah Barker

Linking structure to language in Blake’s ‘London‘ by Lance Hanson

William Blake’s London by Lance Hanson

The Prelude: stealing the boat

The Prelude – William Wordsworth by Lance Hanson

My Last Duchess

The Charge of the Light Brigade

Exposure 

Storm on the Island

Bayonet Charge

Remains

‘Remains’ by Simon Armitage – A Guide by Mark Roberts

Poppies

War Photographer

Tissue

Paper that lets the light shine through… by Sarah Barker

The émigree

Kamikaze

Kamikaze: some supplementary thoughts by Sarah Barker

Checking Out Me History

 

 

 

 

 

2 comments

  1. Thank you for sharing. If I find the time, in my nascent position as an RQT, I may just tackle one of the gaps that need filling…
    How does one set up a blog like yours without too much fancy stuff?

    Like

    1. I’d love you to start blogging, Hugh. I find WordPress pretty easy to navigate. Doesn’t take long to set up and, if you get stuck, let me know and I’ll try and help. However, if I can do it then anybody can!

      Like

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